Help Support CCC, go to Cold Smoke through the Month of September

Cold Smoke is dedicated to supporting local non-profits, they donate all cash tips for a month to a designated non-profit. Child Care Connections has been chosen for the month of September. If you enjoy a nice cup of coffee or tea, please visit either Cold Smoke location. Click here for more information.

September is National Preparedness Month

September is National Preparedness Month and CCAoA is encouraging parents, child care providers and child care resource and referral staff to take the Preparedness Pledge. By signing up for the preparedness pledge you will receive a task each week of September. These tasks are designed to help you be more prepared. Click here for more information. 

Are You Using it Right? Know your Child’s Car Seat is Correct

As part of National Seat Check Saturday local Child Passenger Safety Technicians will be checking car seats at the Gallatin Valley Mall on September 23rd from 10:00am to 1:00pm.

Click here for the official flyer.

Fun & Healthy Snack: Veggie & Pretzel Scooter

Cut four slices of cucumbers for wheels. Take a piece of string cheese and horizontally insert two toothpicks into each end. Slide the cucumber slices on the toothpicks for the wheels. Make a small hole in the top of the string cheese at one end and insert a pretzel stick into it. Use cream cheese to attach a second pretzel stick horizontally for the handlebar.

Building Relationships Part 3 of 3: Children

A new school year is approaching, so it is likely that change is happening in many of your programs; whether children are leaving or new children are enrolling.  The relationships that you establish with the children, will last a lifetime.  You have entered their hearts and have made an impact in their lives.  The type of impact rests solely in your hands! 

A few tips and ideas for building positive, lasting relationships with children in your care include:

Get to know the child

  • Distribute interest surveys that parents fill out about their child
  • Have a conversation over snack
  • Conduct home visits
  • Share information about yourself and find something in common with the child
  • Ask children to bring in family photos and give them an opportunity to share them with you and their peers
  • Have a “Star” of the week who brings in special things from home and gets to share them during circle time
  • Find out what a child’s favorite book is and read it to the whole class
  • Make “all about me” books and share them at circle time
  • Have sharing days

Show respect

  • Greet every child at the door by name
  • Listen to a child’s ideas and stories and be an appreciative audience
  • Post children’s work
  • Acknowledge a child’s effort
  • Learn a child’s home language

Invest into the relationship

  • Follow a child’s lead during play
  • Send positive notes home
  • Provide praise and encouragement
  • Give positive descriptive compliments liberally
  • Call a child’s parent to say what a great day she/he are having in front of the child
  • Write all of the special things about a child on a T-shirt and let him/her wear it
  • Play a game with a child
  • Play outside with a child
  • Ride the bus with a child
  • Go to an extracurricular activity with the child
  • Give hugs, high fives, and thumbs up for accomplishing tasks
  • Hold a child’s hand
  • Call a child after a bad day and say “I’m sorry we had a bad day today – I know tomorrow is going to be better!”
  • Tell a child how much he/she was missed when the child misses a day of school

IF we include a few of these tips into our daily routine, the children we build relationships with will be easier to teach, more compliant, and less likely to engage in challenging behavior.  The teachers will feel more positive about their skills, their effort – and tend to like their jobs even more.  The adults will begin to see the “ripple effect” of relationship building. As children learn in the context of caring relationships with adults, they will become more skilled at building positive relationships with other children. By providing a child with the opportunity to have a warm and responsive relationship with you means that you have the pleasure of getting to know the child as well.

 

Adapted from:  Building Positive Relationships with Young Children, www.pyramidmodel.org

Get Inside & Play!

Fire season wreaks havoc on everyone – particularly our young children whom need outside playtime to help burn energy, learn new skills such as problem solving (there’s only two swings and 3 children!) and how to treat our friends (using kindness and empathy are a great start!). There is a large emerging body of scientific research supporting the benefits and importance of outdoor play, and the role it plays in healthy growth and development. But what do we do when air quality is so poor?  Here are a few ways you can help support your child’s behavioral and emotional health (and keep YOUR cool) when outdoor play is less of an option!

Activity Cube:

Tape an empty square box shut (square is best and looks like a large dice!)
Cut different colored pieces of construction paper and glue to the side of the box.
Write different exercises on each side of the box (Touch Toes, Arm Circles, Jumping Jacks, Hop Backwards, Hop on one Foot, Run in Place, etc.)
 

To play, just have your little one roll the cube like you would dice and whatever it lands on, you do! This is a great way to redirect any unwanted behaviors that accompany Cabin Fever!

Tape Lines:

Make 5-10 separate lines of tape, each about a foot apart, on your floor or carpet. Label the first one the “start” line and then give your kids simple instructions:

Long Jump: See how many lines they can jump over. Have them try and beat their best score each time. Experiment with arm swinging vs. arms behind their backs.
Run ‘n’ Jump: Now let them take a running start and see if they can jump even further!
Long Jump Backwards: Increase the difficulty by performing the tasks jumping backwards.
Hop: How far can they jump on one leg?
Reach ‘n’ Stretch: How far can their leg reach with one foot on the “start” line?

Mirror, Mirror: 

Stand face to face with your child, about a foot apart, and have them attempt to copy all your movements.

Reach up and stretch to the sky.
Do 10 jumping jacks.
Run in place.
Act like a monkey. Make it fun and you’ll both be working up a sweat in no time. Then switch roles and copy your child – they won’t be able to hold back the laughter (and neither will you!).

Heidi Lester M.Ed.
Pyramid Model / ASQ Trainer & Coach
Child Care Connections
heidi@cccmontana.org

FREE Dental Care- August 26th (Bozeman)

This is the day that Hay's Dental Group gives back to the community. Click here for more information.

CACFP Meal Pattern Updates

Centers and day care homes offering meals through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) play a critical role in supporting the wellness, health, and development of children through the provision of nutritious foods. Child care providers, in particular, have a powerful opportunity to instill healthy habits in young children that serve as a foundation for healthy choices in life.

The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, USDA made the first major changes in the CACFP meals and snacks since the Program’s inception in 1968, which will help ensure children have access to healthy, balanced meals and snacks throughout the day. The updated CACFP nutrition standards will help safeguard the health of children early in their lives. 

These improvements are expected to enhance the quality of meals served in CACFP to help young children learn healthy eating habits early on in their lives and improve the wellness of adult participants. CACFP centers and day care homes may continue to comply with the current meal standards as they transition to the updated meal standards. However, all aspects of meals served through the CACFP must meet the updated standards no later than October 1, 2017.

Under the updated CACFP nutrition standards, meals and snacks served will include a greater variety of vegetables and fruit, more whole grains, and less added sugar and saturated fat. In addition, the standards encourage breastfeeding and better align the CACFP with the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and with other Child Nutrition Programs. 

Click here for updated flyer.

REMINDER…Sign-on/Sign-Out Sheets

“All child care providers (including Legally Certified Providers [LCP}) shall maintain current sign-in/sign-out records for each child receiving child care assistance and utilize them as follows:

Each time the child enters or leaves the facility identified on the Child Care Service Plan, the parent or other individual authorized to deliver or pick up the child shall sign the sign-in/sign-out sheet. An electronic signature system may be used if it employs a

unique and confidential identification process for individuals. With electronic systems, providers must ensure verification that records are not able to be changed without parental involvement. If records can be changed, providers must have a policy in place which parents manually sign off on that the sign in and out sheets are true and correct.

Sign-in/sign-out records must indicate the facility name and location, the child's name, the date, the hour, and the minute when the child enters and leaves the facility identified on the Child Care Service Plan. All children in attendance on a given day must be on the same sign-in/sign-out record and not be divided by family.
The provider shall make their sign-in/sign-out records available to child care resource and referral agency staff and state and local government health, safety, or law enforcement representatives upon request.
The provider shall keep sign-in/sign-out records for five years beyond the date of attendance.
The provider shall manage sign-in/sign-out sheets in a manner which protects the identity of families receiving scholarship assistance but does not single them out.”

Each provider is responsible to complete their rights and responsibilities. In that document it states:

All child care providers shall maintain current sign-in/sign-out records for each child receiving child care assistance and utilize them as follows:

Each time the child enters or leaves the provider's care, the parent or other individual authorized to deliver or pick up the child shall initial or sign the sign-in/sign-out sheet. An electronic signature system may be used if it employs a unique and confidential identification process for individuals.

Sign-in/sign-out records must indicate the child's name, the date, the hour, and the minute when the child enters and leaves the provider's care.

The provider shall make sign-in/sign-out records available to child care resource and referral agency staff and state and local government health, safety, or law enforcement representatives upon request.

The provider shall keep sign-in/sign-out records for five years beyond the date of attendance.

For more information, click here for the full policy manual

Kids Summer Lunch Program

HRDC’s Summer Lunch Program is gearing up for our 12th year. Below are details and information about each site. Last year we prepared close to 30,000 Meals, this year we have increased our partnerships and are projecting to serve around 40,000 meals across all sites. For the full flyer click here. Click here for more information.

Coaches Corner: Building Relationships Part 2: Families

Spring is time for new growth and new beginnings, a wonderful time to reconnect with your families. Planning a Family Get Together is the perfect way to demonstrate your appreciation of their trust in you.  Whether the families are close friends or new to your program, it is essential to show you care for them as a whole.  Meeting and mingling with the teachers can help ease family’s anxieties and validate their decision to enroll their children. It will re-establish how you are all connected through your community (your program). Click here for the full article.

Coaches Corner: Building Relationships Part 1: Colleagues

Building meaningful relationships is the cornerstone of any Early Childhood Program.  Strong positive relationships will result in effective communication, cooperation and collaboration.  Think of relationships as a car, if it is taken care of and full of gas, it runs like a dream and is reliable.  If you neglect your car and let it get low on gas, you nervously watch the control panel for lights to appear, saying you are out of gas or you need to check your engine.  If you run your gas tank dry and/or that engine light comes on, your car is in for some major repairs….which you may not be able to handle yourself.  The mechanic (the expert) lets you know that he needs to overhaul the engine due to the damage and gives you an estimate that you will not be able to use your car for a month.   It is much easier and less stressful if you keep your car in good working order.  The same goes for your relationships. Click here for full article.

CCC Training Fee Update

After much thought and consideration, Child Care Connections will be raising the training fee for classroom training effective July 1, 2017. This decision is based on the fee’s we must pay to use and maintain online registration. Online registration is contractually required of us through our contract, and has proven to be very time efficient and user friendly. Click here for full letter.

Does your helmet fit properly?